Stalking Games

 

 

 

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Scout Books

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By Sir Robert Baden-Powell

CHAPTER Il

STALKING GAMES

1. DEER-STALKING.

The Scoutmaster acts as a deer, not hiding but standing, and moving occasionally now and then. 

The Scouts go out to find the deer, and each tries in his own way to get up to it unseen. 

Directly the Scoutmaster sees a Scout he directs him to stand up as having failed. After a certain time the Scoutmaster calls "Time," and all stand up at the spot which they have reached, and the nearest wins. 

The same game may be played to test the Scouts in stepping lightly--the umpire being blindfolded. The practice should preferably be carried out where there are dry twigs, stones, gravel and so on lying about. The Scout may start to stalk the blind enemy at one hundred yards distance, and he must do it fairly fast--say in one minute and a half--to touch the blind man before he hears him.

2. STALKING AND REPORTING.

The umpire places himself out in the open and sends each Scout or pair of Scouts away in different directions about half a mile off. When he waves a flag, which is the signal to begin, they all hide, and then proceed to stalk him, creeping up and watching all he does.  When he waves the flag again, they rise, come in, and report each in turn all that he did, either in writing or verbally, as may be ordered.

The umpire meantime has kept a look-out in each direction, and every time he sees a Scout, he takes two It points off that Scout's score.  He, on his part, performs small actions, such as sitting down, kneeling up, an looking through glasses, using handkerchief, taking hat off for a bit, walking round in a circle a few times, to give Scouts something to note and report about him. 

Scouts are given three points for each act reported, correctly. It saves time if the umpire makes out a scoring card beforehand, giving the name of each Scout, and a number of columns showing each act of his, and what mark that Scout wins, also a column of deducted marks for exposing themselves.

3. SCOUT HUNTING.

One Scout is given time to go out and hide himself-- the remainder then start to find him. The object of the hidden Scout is to get back to the starting-place as soon as he can without being caught. The seekers advance from the starting-place in a circle, gradually expanding outwards--so the further the Scout goes from home to hide himself, the further apart the seekers will be when they reach his hiding-place, but he will then have a longer distance to go to reach home again.

4. SHADOWING.

A patrol is told off to shadow a party of the enemy, Who are advancing through the country (consisting another patrol or the rest of the troop). The patrol told off to shadow the rest must follow on as closely as possible, but it is. best to send on one or two Scouts ahead, to signal when it is safe to advance. 

As soon the enemy see a Scout shadowing them they can give chase, and if they overtake him he is a prisoner, and has to march with the main body. They can also split up into two parties and join again further on, or leave some behind in ambush. 

It is only necessary to touch the shadowers to make them prisoners. If they cannot throw them off their tracks within a certain distance (two miles or so), or else capture more than half of them, they must own themselves defeated; and then another patrol takes the place of the shadowers. (This can be practiced along a route march--it has the advantage of always covering fresh ground in the advance.)

5. AMBUSHING.

The main body advances along a road, with Scouts thrown out on either side to prevent any danger of surprise. 

Two patrols (the enemy) are following them behind, and attempt to ambush them by one patrol getting in front and the other attacking in the rear. They shadow the main body as it advances until a suitable part of country is reached, when one patrol attempts to g ahead by going round in a semi-circle and joining the road again further on. 

If they can do it, they hide an ambush and attack the main body when it comes up ; the other patrol which has been following behind should then immediately attack in the rear. For to be a successful ambush the patrol in the rear should be able to attack immediately the ambush is reached and so, should follow closely behind. 

If the patrol making the semi-circle are seen, they should be followed and the ambush discovered; both they and the other patrol behind can be captured, just as in "Shadowing" by merely being touched.

6. MIMIC BATTLE.

For this game two sides are needed, the numbers being settled "among the players. 

The ammunition is a quantity of paper balls. 

Every Scout has a plate, and the parties take up positions within throwing distance of each other. If the ground isn't flat, toss up for the advantage of the slope 

Each Scout lies flat on his stomach, and just in front of him props up his plate by sticking the rim into the ground. 

At the word "go" each warrior aims a ball at an opponent's plate. When a plate is knocked down, the Scout to whom it belongs is "put out of action." 

The side which succeeds in "killing" most opponents in a given time wins.

Baden-Powell's Scouting Games

 

 

   

 

 


Additional Information:

Peer- Level Topic Links:
Scouting Games ] [ Stalking Games ] Tracking Games ] Indoor Games ] Camp or Playground ] Cycists' Games: Bikes ] Town Games ] Night Games ] Seamanship Games ] First Aid Games ] Games for Strength ] On Trek ] Kim's Game ]

Parent- Level Topic Links:
Baden-Powell's  Games ] B-P's Adult Military Games ] Dan Beard's Games ] A. Mackenzie's Games ] G. S. Ripley's Games ] Ernest Seton's Games ] J. Thurman's Games ] Smith's Advancement Games ] Wide Games ] Relay Games ] Special Needs Boys' Games ] Politically Incorrect Scout Games ] Game Leadership ] Compass Training Games ] Highland Games ]

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Last modified: October 15, 2016.