Grubs

 

 

 

Search  Inquiry Net

Back ] Home ] Up ] Next ]

Bogerts
Crawfish
Crickets
Eels
Frogs
Grasshopers
Grubs
Katydids
Lamprey Eels
Live Minnows
Mirror Bait
Miscellaneous
Skittering
Squirming Stuff
Worm Work

Scout Books

Site Contents

By Dan Beard


Fig. 87.
The White Grub.

White Grub-Worms.

These are the young or larvae of beetles, and may be found by digging in rich soil or in old rotten logs and stumps. They make good bait for trout, bass, perch, catfish, and sunfish. Keep them in the manner described for keeping the earth, angle, or garden worm.

Gentles, or Young Blue-Bottle Flies

are not pleasant creatures to look upon, or pleasant to capture, or pleasant to handle. But there is no accounting for tastes. It is evident that fish do not look upon the white carrion-eating baby fly in the same light that we do, for they are very fond of gentles ; and from quaint old Walton down to the present time this little grub has been, and still is, used for bait.

The beautiful, dainty, red spotted trout in his cool spring-water stream, is passionately fond of the larvae of the blue-bottle fly. If you are camping out or living near your fishing-grounds, take any old offal and put it in an old can, bucket, or other deep vessel in a shady out-of- the-way place, where mink or other small animals will not disturb it.

Wandering blue-bottle flies will soon discover the tempting display and deposit their eggs in it, and in a few days there will be plenty of bait. When they are full grown carefully remove them by gently knocking the larva, with a stick on a piece of birch bark or paper.

How to Keep the Trout Bait

Place them in a box of sand or bran. Here they will soon cleanse themselves and become of a milk-white hue, losing all their disgusting features. Keep them in a damp, cool place to stop them from maturing, or going into the chrysalis state, preparatory to becoming blue-bottle flies.

OHB

 

 

   

 

 


Additional Information:

Peer- Level Topic Links:
Bogerts ] Crawfish ] Crickets ] Eels ] Frogs ] Grasshopers ] [ Grubs ] Katydids ] Lamprey Eels ] Live Minnows ] Mirror Bait ] Miscellaneous ] Skittering ] Squirming Stuff ] Worm Work ]

Parent- Level Topic Links:
Kite Making Plans ] Marble Games ] Marble Basics ] Stilts ] Tops ] Fish Bait ] Fish Sense ] Hoops & Wheels ] Pet Frogs ] Sucker ] Balloons ]

The Inquiry Net Main Topic Links:
 [Outdoor Skills]  [Patrol Method [Old-School]  [Adults [Advancement]  [Ideals]  [Leadership]  [Uniforms]

Search This Site:

Search Amazon.Com:

When you place an order with Amazon.Com using the search box below, a small referral fee is returned to The Inquiry Net to help defer the expense of keeping us online.  Thank you for your consideration!

Search:

Keywords:

Amazon Logo

 

 

Scout Books Trading Post

Dead Bugs, Blow Guns, Sharp Knives, & Snakes:
What More Could A Boy Want?

Old School Scouting:
What to Do, and How to Do It!

To Email me, replace "(at)" below with "@"
Rick(at)Kudu.Net

If you have questions about one of my 2,000 pages here, you must send me the "URL" of the page!
This "URL" is sometimes called the "Address" and it is usually found in a little box near the top of your screen.  Most URLs start with the letters "http://"

The Kudu Net is a backup "mirror" of The Inquiry Net.  

2003, 2011 The Inquiry Net, http://inquiry.net  In addition to any Copyright still held by the original authors, the Scans, Optical Character Recognition, extensive Editing,  and HTML Coding on this Website are the property of the Webmaster.   My work may be used by individuals for non-commercial, non-web-based activities, such as Scouting, research, teaching, and personal use so long as this copyright statement and a URL to my material is included in the text
The purpose of this Website is to provide access  to hard to find, out-of-print documents.  Much of the content has been edited to be of practical use in today's world and is not intended as historical preservation.   I will be happy to provide scans of specific short passages in the original documents for people involved in academic research.  

 

Last modified: October 15, 2016.